Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
KQED (PBS) 3
WETA 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
we will be joined by zachary goldfarb. our guests will also include alex gilb. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning and welcome to the washington journal. makers are in washington for the remaining weeks of the lame-duck session. the president is taking his ideas on the road to meet with the public. the white house says toy manufacturer is would be hard hit. republicans are planning meetings with small business owners across the country to force the president to back down on raising taxes on the wealthy. former florida governor jeb bush is gathering policy experts and dedication leader's fourth annual education summit. we covered yesterday's events pick. that's where we begin. mr. bush says the unions are barriers to better schools. how would you fix your school system? we want to get your take on it. also, send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with the "washington times headline" -- we want to show you what the former florida governor had to say at yesterday's event. [video clip] >> we need to have a teacher evaluation system
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
the federal deficit in half, instead he doubled it. >> rose: joining me from washington, d.c. is albert hunt of bloomberg news and john harris of politico. from des moines, iowa, john mile man. in new york, mark hall prin, cokie roberts and mat dowd of abc news and bloomberg news. i'm pleased they have them back on this program. we go to washington and albert hunt. where are we? >> charlie, i think that the fat lady is started to sing. it looks like thingsre moving in a very, very slow but steady direction in barack obama's favor both in the popular vote and the electoral vote. i base that on the polls, to be sure. also talking to both sides today i think's clearly more confidence in the obama camp. i think this is one of those great elections. there are very few of them, 2004 and 2000 were two where you aren't certain who is going to win but certainly all signs are pointing to a small obama victory tomorrow. >> rose: john harris? >> i agree with that if you look at these numbers and you look at the electoral college landscape and through any conventional prism what al said is completely tru
will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threatens our children's future, our majority passed a budget that begins to solve the problems. now, while others chose inaction in the face of this threat, we offered solutions. and the american people want solutions. and tonight, they have responded by renewing our house republican majority. >> the republicans will now have 221 seats, the 164 for the democrats. one wonders whether the leader the democratic part
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
of those who prevailed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, and rejection, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln is a special case and that his successful second term was so brief. it is interesting to note-only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiat
to washington? >> you asked if i would vote for john boehner so i don't know. i would vote for a republican speaker. let me mention since we're talking about the lack of bipartisan ship. congressman's budget which is an impressive budget it wasn't supported by his own party. so we need people that can come up with bipartisan solutions reach across the table. i'm in the center. he's so far to the left there is no coming home for him. he's not your father's democrat, he's not a john f. kennedy democrat. he's got his own agenda. >> where is the center you could shake hands with a democrat over the table? >> can i? >> yeah, which issue? >> there are plenty of issues. bringing the corporate tax rate down. i think it's a great idea that he came up with and prick supported -- president clinton supported that. >> i'm proud to have the support of president clinton who said the progressive version is the best and it was the budget that most invested in putting america back into the future business because it protects social security, medicare and makes america competitive internationally. so i think
came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you for it, and it was really the way you did it. as i have said, my role in life is to be the grain of sand to the oyster. you irritates the oyster and out comes a pearl. i have been your grain of sand that you chose. it has been an honor to be your grain of sand in this process. we will continue to make pearls as necessary in the future. fair enough? [applause] the american people have spoken. they have chosen governor clinton. congratulations. >> boo! >> wait a minute. the only way we are going to make it work, if we all team up together. let's give governor clinton a big round of applause. but for get the election. forget the election. the hard work is in front of us. we must all work together to rebuild our great country. you, the
's not forget as we dig deeper that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sari horwitz and david woods, senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take my own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student, after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails, it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached grows frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless pho
there are rules in place. you know, there is some things we do not want washington to do. we do not want politicians in washington, most of whom are male, to control health-care decisions that women can make for themselves. [applause] sopnow, for a year's we as a president who share these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. his economic plan and the ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce the deficit still invest in the skills and ideas of our people. at the time the republicans in congress and the senate candidates by the name of mitt -- i don't want you to boo, i want you to vote. i want you to vote. the republican candidates by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plans would hurt the economy and kill jobs. turns out the mouth was just as bad then as it is now. -- the math was just as bad then as it is now. america created 23 million new jobs. our deficit had turned into a surplus. florida, we know our ideas work. we also know their ideas do not. because we try their ideas, too. we tried giving insurance companies and oil companies free rein to
in washington and making history at the same time. that story next. ♪ ♪ ♪ mom? dad? guys? [ engine turns over ] [ engine revs ] ♪ he'll be fine. [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. take advantage of exceptional values during the season of audi event. to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ bikes and balloons, and noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. a wand, some wings, soup with good things. sidewalks and doodles and wholesome noodles. puddles and pails and yes, puppy dog tails. for a lunch like this, there's a hug and a kiss. because that's what happy kids are made of. campbell'
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
on washington on the meeting we were all hoping to be a fly on the wall at. >> how a simple phototurned a cop into a viral angel. "fox and friends" starts right now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> gretchen: good morning, everybody. so everyone should give up because this is the winning ticket right here. >> steve: we didn't give up. >> brian: you get it from missouri. >> gretchen: there are millionaires in new york and new jersey and connecticut. so who knows? stay tuned if you live in those three states. >> brian: it is a happy day for me, we can no longer talk about powerball. i am so tired of the story. give the people the billions. >> steve: now they are part of the one percent that are demonized by the democrats. >> gretchen: two people waking up winning in the 550 million powerball jackpot. did you realize tickets are up to two dollars a piece. i went to buy five. they changed it in january. >> i hoped you won some to defray. >> brian: what are you doing since your show is over. >> talking to you guys about the powerball. powerball officials say that the ticket sold in arizona and state
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
picture from the ronald reagan building in washington, where we will continue our live coverage of a post-election discussion and analysis, "cq" ."oll call live coverage starting at about 1 pop 45 eastern. while we wait, we're keeping an eye on tweeds that reporters are posting about the election. again, coverage of the "cq" "roll call" discussion coming up. right now, war on the election and what is next for congress on to de's "washington journal." reporter roundtable with margaret talev from bloomberg news and scott wilson from "the washington post." here is your special coverage from this morning. what is next? what is the first item for the second obama administration? guest: the first question is the so-called fiscal cliff, which no one wants the country to go over but no one as a way to fix. the president will spend most of the next year working on that. he will have staff issues to work on with turnover in his cabinet, and the senior levels in the west wing as well. things he will take on first. host: margaret talev, what did you hear from him wednesday about negotiations on the f
shift. i remember when i came to washington in the 1980s, people were writing an article, i wrote an article for -- i wrote an article for -- remember that carline bowman -- was that public opinion? >> yeah, yeah. >> on the block, the electoral law, that there was a republican electoral law. i think you'll probably start to see people talk about a democratic electoral lock due to these changing demographics. so the hispanic numbers picked up, and we are seeing an electric whether democrats democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters and white liberals. and that, that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people will say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads among what now are becoming some poor democratic constituencies, at least some. but if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious about the big message you are drawing. if the democrats again what looks to
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
's when he started talking about ending politics as we know it in washington, et cetera. it's coming back to where it all began. he's landed. air force one is here. the first lady's plane has also landed at the airport. the president is greeting her at the airport, they'll arrive here together. there will be a performance from bruce springsteen and a speech here with a lot of the old campaign gang rejoining the team for a final good-bye, anderson. >> what's he doing tomorrow? we know mitt romney is having campaign events tomorrow. is the president not doing that? and why? >> you know, traditionally, first of all, he has not campaigned on election day, it's not his ritual. and he's not going to break ritual. what he'll do tomorrow is play basketball. they have this history, there was one campaign, one election day they did not play basketball. that was that primary against hillary clinton in new hampshire that he lost. and so they always say, they now play basketball every single election day, and that's their rule. >> is that for real? are they really that superstitious? >> oh, yeah. oh,
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
. a conservative that will get things done instead of the yapping that goes on in washington d.c. right now. [applause] our country has huge problems, structural problems that require people that actually want to solve problems rather than just talk about it or excuse the way why it is that things are working. you know, president obama was dealt a tough hand. we hear this everyday if you watch tv. and of course it's my brother's fault for everything that goes on. it's almost as though the dog ate my homework is the reason we're going through tough times. but let me tell you mitt romney from day one, job one will be to restore the american economy so people can purr shoe their dreams as they see fit by limited government and build capacity so people don't have to get in line and be dependent upon government. no one wants to do that. we want a society where the next generation has more opportunities than what we have. and the american dream is what this election is about. are we going to reverse the track we're on which is a false sense of economic security where we get in line and have the g
're having a fight in washington. >> we're going to talk about policy in a minute. i want to talk to you first, michael. you were there. you were at the epi center of this transfer of power. what was it like to be in chicago? >> it was exciting. i mean, people were talking about the enthusiasm gap. i said look. i do a lot of renewal of vows as a minister. and the second time around of course it's different. you know more about him. you know about her. you're a little bit more jaded. you ain't getting flowers every day. but the bill's being paid, baby got shoes and everybody good. so that's the renewal of vows obama. look, i'm out here doing my thing. and it was tremendous. it was electric. it was the understanding that this is a real choice in america between two different options, one of which is selfish and redistributing wealth upward to those who are wealthy, and another one that is concerned about the poor and at least about the middle class. so in that sense, people felt that hey, we ratified today the fundamental principles of democracy, not just giving it to obama. but you got to
of washington, d.c. and even in florida outside of tampa, they're seeing big turnout numbers there, too. they don't think he can get his 2008 turnout numbers but, scott, as you know tonight, it's going to be all about turnout. >> pelley: yes, it will, jan, thank you very much. the candidate who gets his voters to the polls is likely to win today. norah, turnout is everything and the electorate's been changing since 2008. >> it has. that's one of the things i'm going to be looking at tonight. not only how big is the turnout but the size of the electorate. the different democrat graphic groups. we saw as i pointed out during our evening news that 26% of the electorate in 2008 was a minority electorate. does that grow? does it stay the same or shrink? that will be part of it. the white vote which was about 73% of the vote where will that be tonight? it will speak to not only the changing nature of the country's electorate but also give us clues about which candidate is doing better. >> pelley: bob, the national polls over the last few days, dead heat. dead even for both candidates. it's re
of the president. the a. p. reporting about 30 million people in 34 states in washington, d.c. have already cast their votes either in person or by mail. nothing gets counted until tomorrow. many states are releasing information, however about party affiliation and while the president does have a lead in several key battleground states, it is not as large of a lead as it was four years ago. the g.o.p. is up in colorado. while the democrats now lead in florida, iowa, nevada and north carolina. we're back with more steph after the break. stay with us. (vo) this tuesday, current tv presents special election coverage, with unrivaled social media, straight from the campaigns, the pundits, and from viewers like you. with exclusive analysis and commentary from al gore, someone who knows a thing or two about close elections. >> overall, it was a clear win. >> now that's politically direct. >> so keep on tweeting and maybe you'll have your voice be part of this democracy and see your tweets up on our screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ we were skipping stones ♪ ♪ and letting
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
washington to dine at the white house was taken as an outrage in many corridors. america today is a world away from the cruel and prideful bigotry of that time. there is no better evidence of this than the election of an african-american to the presidency of the united states. >> senator mccain was right. that at no other time in american history could this moment have been possible. and even as the opponent, he was a bit swept up in that moment. remember the front page of the new york times after the election, obama, racial barrier falls in decisive victory. the victory was decisive, but the barrier had not fallen. then senator obama was simply hoisted over it, propelled by decades of civil rights demonstrations. hard won legislative victories, educational opportunities and shifting racial boundaries. but senator mccain, "the new york times" and frankly many pundits writing in the heady moments of the victory failed to articulate how firmly the barriers remained intabt. the win was a culmination, not the single definitive, most sought after culmination, but a culmination of racial strugg
also believe, by the way, there are some things washington should not do, for example, we don't need a bunch of politicians trying to control health care decisions that women are perfectly capable of making themselves. [ cheers and applause ] for four years, we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and it's interesting, when he first came into office, his economic plan asked the wealthier americans to play a little more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, the republican congress and a certain senate candidate by the name of mitt romney -- [ crowd booing ] don't boo, vote. vote. you don't need to boo. folks can't hear you boo, but they can hear you vote. anyway, this candidate, mr. romney, along with the republican congress, they all said, bill clinton's playing us terrible. it will hurt the economy. it's going to kill jobs. turns out, their math was just as bad then as it is now because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america has created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up, poverty
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)